How to flush automatic transmission fluid

how to flush automatic transmission fluid

Transmission Fluid Change VS. Flush – What’s The Difference?

Before flushing your transmission pull the dipstick and look closely at the fluid. If the fluid is dark and has a burnt odor, atransmission flush is not recommended. The recommended service is a fluid and filter change. 1) Start the engine and allow it to warm up to normal operating temperature and then shut it off. Open the case of transmission fluid and remove the caps from all of the transmission fluid. Once you start the vehicle it will start pumping the transmission fluid out into the 5 gallon bucket. You will need to add fluid quickly. Start the vehicle (or have your helper do it) and then start adding transmission fluid through the funnel.

One of the most important parts of car maintenance involves flushing out and replacing the transmission fluid. It is true a lot of people take their cars how long is a flight from denver to florida to how to make easter sugar eggs their transmission flushed and new fluid put in.

That does not have to be the case for you. If you want to save money, you can do it yourself relatively easy instead of taking it to a garage.

Of course, you need to be willing to get a little dirty doing it. Do not work on the vehicle if it is only being supported by a car jack. You should have the vehicle up on car ramps and on a flat surface. Remove your transmission dip stick. A lot of transmissions have drain plugs, so you will need to locate this and then put your drain pan under that area of the transmission.

If your transmission does not have a drain plug then make sure to place your drain pan directly under the transmission pan and begin removing every other transmission bolt. You will need to leave 2 of the transmission bolts on each side of the transmission but remove the rest of them and set aside. On one side, carefully remove the 2 bolts so the transmission fluid will begin to leak out. On the other side, begin to loosen the bolts very slowly.

When it feels like the bolts are 2 or 3 threads from coming off, immediately push the transmission pan up and then remove the other 2 bolts and set aside as well. After all of the bolts are out, lower the pan and let the fluid flow into the drain pan. You should inspect the drain pan for debris.

Use a drill with a wire wheel to remove the old transmission gasket. You can also use a scraper to remove the gasket as well.

Transmission how to fix a brother printer usually have a magnet that collects some of the metal dust. Make sure to clean the magnet off. Then clean off the transmission pan. After you have done that replace the magnet. Make sure that the holes for mounting on the new filter match exactly to the old filter, otherwise the filter will not fit in your transmission.

Do a visual check before proceeding. Remove the old filter by removing the mounting bolts. More fluid will probably come out when you are doing this so make sure the drain pan is in place.

Remove the old filter and put it in a plastic bag that can be thrown away properly. After you have done this, get out from under the car and let the transmission drain for at least 1 hour before doing anything else to it.

After the transmission is drained you will now install the new filter. Put the drain plug back in. Grease the gasket with wheel bearing grease. Tighten the bolts for the transmission pan. Make sure that it is every other one that you tighten. Make sure not to tighten any more than 15 to 20 inch per pound. After the pan bolts are properly torqued, clean the area and lower the car.

Put in 3 quarts of transmission fluid, and put the dip stick back in the vehicle. Check fluid level and add as needed. We welcome your comments and suggestions.

All information is provided "AS IS. All rights reserved. You may freely link to this site, and use it for non-commercial use subject to our terms of use. View our Privacy Policy here. Toggle navigation subscribe. How to Flush Transmission Fluid. Written by Heaven Stubblefield. To ensure our content is always up-to-date with current information, best practices, and professional advice, articles are routinely reviewed by industry experts with years of hands-on experience.

What You'll Need. Car lift or ramps. Drain pan. Drill with wire wheel. New gasket. New transmission filter. Transmission fluid. How to Change Wheel Bearings on a Car. Car Maintenance and Repair Questions - Part 2. Boat Repair: Fixing the Trailer. I've watched a couple videos and read a few articles about doing a transmis Read More. Is clutch fluid the manual transmission oil?

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By Jude Barton.

What is a Transmission Flush

Nov 14,  · euro-caspian.comr wanted to do a complete Automatic Transmission Service with a Fluid Flush and Fluid Change! Well now you can do it in 10 Minute. Oct 08,  · In this video I am going to show you how you can replace the transmission fluid and filter but also more important how you can do a DIY transmission fluid fl. You will need to leave 2 of the transmission bolts on each side of the transmission but remove the rest of them and set aside. On one side, carefully remove the 2 bolts so the transmission fluid will begin to leak out. On the other side, begin to loosen the bolts very slowly.

Change transmission fluid every 30, miles. Most owner's manuals say it isn't necessary. Yeah, right. That's why transmission shops are making a fortune replacing burned out automatic transmissions. For optimum protection, change the Transmission Fluid and filter every 30, miles unless you have a new vehicle that is filled with Dexron III ATF, which is supposed to be good for , miles. An automatic transmission creates a lot of internal heat through friction: the friction of the fluid churning inside the torque converter, friction created when the clutch plates engage, and the normal friction created by gears and bearings carrying their loads.

It doesn't take long for the automatic transmission fluid ATF to heat up once the vehicle is in motion. Normal driving will raise fluid temperatures to degrees F.

If fluid temperatures can be held to degrees F. But if the fluid temperature goes much higher, the life of the fluid begins to plummet. The problem is even normal driving can push fluid temperatures well beyond safe limits.

And once that happens, the trouble begins. At elevated operating temperatures, ATF oxidizes, turns brown and takes on a smell like burnt toast. As heat destroys the fluid's lubricating qualities and friction characteristics, varnish begins to form on internal parts such as the valve body which interferes with the operation of the transmission.

If the temperature gets above degrees F. At higher temperatures the transmission begins to slip, which only aggravates overheating even more. Eventually the clutches burn out and the transmission calls it quits. As a rule of thumb, every 20 degree increase in operating temperature above degrees F.

At degrees F. At degrees, which is commonly encountered in many transmissions, the fluid is only good for about 25, miles. Add another 20 degrees, and life expectancy drops to 5, miles.

Go to or degrees F. If you think this is propaganda put forth by the suppliers of ATF to sell more fluid, think again. And most of these can be blamed on worn out fluid that should have been replaced. On most vehicles, the automatic transmission fluid is cooled by a small heat exchanger inside the bottom or end tank of the radiator.

Hot ATF from the transmission circulates through a short loop of pipe and is thus "cooled. Tests have shown that the typical original equipment oil cooler is marginal at best. ATF that enters the radiator cooler at degrees F.

Any number of things can push ATF temperatures beyond the system's ability to maintain safe limits: towing a trailer, mountain driving, driving at sustained high speeds during hot weather, stop-and-go driving in city traffic, "rocking" an automatic transmission from drive to reverse to free a tire from mud or snow, etc. Problems in the cooling system itself such as a low coolant level, a defective cooling fan, fan clutch, thermostat or water pump, an obstructed radiator, etc.

In some cases, transmission overheating can even lead to engine coolant overheating! That's why there's a good demand for auxiliary add-on transmission coolers. An auxiliary transmission fluid cooler is easy to install and can substantially lower fluid operating temperatures. What kind of automatic transmission fluid should you use in your transmission?

The type specified in your owner's manual or printed on the transmission dipstick. For older Ford automatics and certain imports, Type "F" is usually required. Using Type F fluid in an application that calls for Dexron II may make the transmission shift too harshly.

Using Dexron II in a transmission that requires Type F may allow the transmission to slip under heavy load, which can accelerate clutch wear. It's a messy job because there's no drain plug to change the fluid, but you can do it yourself if you're so inclined.

To change the fluid, you have to get under your vehicle and remove the pan from the bottom of the transmission. When you loosen the pan, fluid will start to dribble out in all directions so you need a fairly large catch pan. You should also know that removing the pan doesn't drain all of the old fluid out of the transmission. Approximately a third of the old fluid will still be in the torque converter.

There's no drain plug on the converter so you're really only doing a partial fluid change. Even so, a partial fluid change is better than no fluid change at all. A typical fluid change will require anywhere from 3 to 6 quarts of ATF depending on the application, a new filter and a pan gasket or RTV sealer for the transmission pan.

The pan must be thoroughly cleaned prior to reinstallation. This includes wiping all fluid residue from the inside of the pan and scraping all traces of the old gasket from the pan's sealing surface. Don't forget to clean the mounting flange on the transmission, too. When the new filter is installed, be sure it is mounted in the exact same position as the original and that any O-rings or other gaskets have been properly positioned prior to tightening the bolts.

Then tighten the bolts to the manufacturer's recommended specs. When refilling the transmission with fresh fluid, be careful not to allow any dirt or debris to enter the dipstick tube. Using a long-neck funnel with a built-in screen is recommended. Too much fluid can cause the fluid to foam, which in turn can lead to erratic shifting, oil starvation and transmission damage. Too much fluid may also force ATF to leak past the transmission seals. Add half a quart at a time until the dipstick shows full.

The transmission really isn't full yet because the dipstick should be checked when the fluid is hot, and the engine is idling with the gear selector in Park. So start the engine, drive the vehicle around the block, then recheck the fluid level while the engine is idling and add fluid as needed until the dipstick reads full. Thank you for your quote request. A representative will get back to you shortly. For immediate assistance please call. Enter City, State or Zip:.

Displaying all locations. Your Vehicle: Year. Get My Vehicle Info. Why ATF Wears Out An automatic transmission creates a lot of internal heat through friction: the friction of the fluid churning inside the torque converter, friction created when the clutch plates engage, and the normal friction created by gears and bearings carrying their loads.

Auxiliary Cooling An auxiliary transmission fluid cooler is easy to install and can substantially lower fluid operating temperatures. Atf Fluid Types What kind of automatic transmission fluid should you use in your transmission? Changing The Fluid It's a messy job because there's no drain plug to change the fluid, but you can do it yourself if you're so inclined.

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