How to configure redhat cluster

how to configure redhat cluster

Chapter 1. Red Hat Cluster Configuration and Management Overview

2 days ago · configuration files added to the complexity. Building a solution on a hardened OS like Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8 and using a professionally packaged multi-master MySQL distribution from Percona makes it easy. This guide shows you how. # yum -y module disable mysql # yum -y install percona-xtradb-cluster Configure the cluster. Configuring Red Hat High Availability Add-On software with command-line tools consists of the following steps: Creating a cluster. Refer to Section , “Creating a Basic Cluster Configuration File”.

Hide Table of Contents English English. Chapter 1. Red Hat Cluster allows conigure to connect a group of computers called nodes or members to ohw together as a cluster.

You can use Red Hat Cluster to suit your clustering needs for example, setting rddhat a cluster for sharing files on a GFS file system or setting up service failover. Configuration Basics. To set up a cluster, you must connect the nodes to certain cluster hardware and configure the nodes into the cluster environment.

This chapter provides an overview of cluster configuration and management, and tools available for configuring and managing a Red Hat Cluster. Configuring and managing a Red Hat Cluster consists of the following basic steps:.

Setting up hardware. Refer to Section 1. Installing Red Hat Cluster software. Configuring Red Hat Cluster Software. Setting Up Hardware. Setting up hardware consists of connecting cluster nodes to other hardware required to run a Red Hat Cluster. The amount and type of hardware varies according to the purpose and availability requirements of the cluster. Typically, an enterprise-level cluster requires the following type of hardware refer to Figure 1. Ethernet switch or hub for public network — This is required for client access to the cluster.

Ethernet switch or hub for private network — This is required for communication among the cluster nodes and other cluster hardware such as network power switches and Fibre Channel switches. Network power switch — A network power switch is recommended to perform fencing in an enterprise-level cluster.

A Fibre Channel switch can be configured to perform fencing. Storage — Some type of storage is required for a cluster. The type required depends on the purpose of the cluster.

For considerations about hardware and other cluster configuration concerns, refer to Chapter 2, Before Configuring a Red Hat Cluster or check what country is afghanistan located in an authorized Red Hat representative. To revhat Red Hat Cluster software, you must have entitlements for the software.

If you are using the Conga configuration GUI, you can let it install the cluster software. If you are using other tools to configure the cluster, secure and install the software as you would with Red Hat Enterprise Linux software. Configuring Red Hat Cluster software consists of using configuration tools to specify the relationship among the cluster components.

Figure 1. The cluster nodes are connected to one or more fencing devices. Nodes can be grouped into a failover domain for a cluster service. The following cluster configuration tools are available with Red Hat How to configure redhat cluster. Conga — This is a comprehensive user interface for installing, configuring, and managing Red Hat clusters, computers, and storage attached to clusters and computers.

Command line tools — This is a set of command line tools for configuring and managing a Red Hat cluster. A brief overview of each configuration tool is provided in the following sections:. Section 1. In addition, information about using Conga and system-config-cluster is provided in subsequent chapters of this document. Information about the command line tools is available in the what is known as the shinbone pages for the tools.

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Install the cluster software

Oct 20,  · How to Configure Redhat Cluster in Linux? 1. Login to UANODE1P and configure new IP () with host alias UANODE1. [[email protected] ~]# ifconfig euro-caspian.com to UANODE2P and configure new IP with host alias UANODE2. [[email protected] ~]# ifconfig bond1 bond1 Link 3. . Displaying the full cluster configuration; 4. Creating a Red Hat High-Availability cluster with Pacemaker. Installing cluster software; Installing the pcp-zeroconf package (recommended) Creating a high availability cluster; Creating a high availability cluster with multiple links; Configuring fencing; Configure the following parameters (attributes) in the service element: autostart — Specifies whether to autostart the service when the cluster starts. Use '1' to enable and '0' to disable; the default is enabled. domain — Specifies a failover domain (if required).

A node that is unresponsive may still be accessing data. For fence agents that provide a method option, a value of cycle is unsupported and should not be specified, as it may cause data corruption. The format for the command to create a stonith device is as follows.

For a listing of the available stonith creation options, see the pcs stonith -h display. Some fence devices can fence only a single node, while other devices can fence multiple nodes. The parameters you specify when you create a fencing device depend on what your fencing device supports and requires. After configuring a fence device, it is imperative that you test the device to ensure that it is working correctly. For information on testing a fence device, see Testing a fence device.

Any cluster node can fence any other cluster node with any fence device, regardless of whether the fence resource is started or stopped. Whether the resource is started controls only the recurring monitor for the device, not whether it can be used, with the following exceptions:. Table 9. A mapping of host names to port numbers for devices that do not support host names. For example: node;node,3 tells the cluster to use port 1 for node1 and ports 2 and 3 for node2.

How to determine which machines are controlled by the device. Note that these properties are for advanced use only. An alternate parameter to supply instead of port. Some devices do not support the standard port parameter or may provide additional ones.

Use this to specify an alternate, device-specific parameter that should indicate the machine to be fenced. A value of none can be used to tell the cluster not to supply any additional parameters. An alternate command to run instead of reboot. Some devices do not support the standard commands or may provide additional ones.

Use this to specify an alternate, device-specific, command that implements the reboot action. Specify an alternate timeout to use for reboot actions instead of stonith-timeout. Use this to specify an alternate, device-specific, timeout for reboot actions. The maximum number of times to retry the reboot command within the timeout period.

Some devices do not support multiple connections. Operations may fail if the device is busy with another task so Pacemaker will automatically retry the operation, if there is time remaining. Use this option to alter the number of times Pacemaker retries reboot actions before giving up. An alternate command to run instead of off. Use this to specify an alternate, device-specific, command that implements the off action.

Specify an alternate timeout to use for off actions instead of stonith-timeout. Some devices need much more or much less time to complete than normal.

Use this to specify an alternate, device-specific, timeout for off actions. The maximum number of times to retry the off command within the timeout period. Use this option to alter the number of times Pacemaker retries off actions before giving up. An alternate command to run instead of list. Use this to specify an alternate, device-specific, command that implements the list action. Specify an alternate timeout to use for list actions. Use this to specify an alternate, device-specific, timeout for list actions.

The maximum number of times to retry the list command within the timeout period. Use this option to alter the number of times Pacemaker retries list actions before giving up. An alternate command to run instead of monitor. Use this to specify an alternate, device-specific, command that implements the monitor action. Specify an alternate timeout to use for monitor actions instead of stonith-timeout. Use this to specify an alternate, device-specific, timeout for monitor actions.

The maximum number of times to retry the monitor command within the timeout period. Use this option to alter the number of times Pacemaker retries monitor actions before giving up.

An alternate command to run instead of status. Use this to specify an alternate, device-specific, command that implements the status action. Specify an alternate timeout to use for status actions instead of stonith-timeout. Use this to specify an alternate, device-specific, timeout for status actions. The maximum number of times to retry the status command within the timeout period. Use this option to alter the number of times Pacemaker retries status actions before giving up. Enable a base delay for stonith actions and specify a base delay value.

In a cluster with an even number of nodes, configuring a delay can help avoid nodes fencing each other at the same time in an even split. A random delay can be useful when the same fence device is used for all nodes, and differing static delays can be useful on each fencing device when a separate device is used for each node.

The overall delay is derived from a random delay value adding this static delay so that the sum is kept below the maximum delay. If both of these delays are configured, they are added together and thus would generally not be used in conjunction.

Enable a random delay for stonith actions and specify the maximum of random delay. The overall delay is derived from this random delay value adding a static delay so that the sum is kept below the maximum delay.

The maximum number of actions that can be performed in parallel on this device. A value of -1 is unlimited. For advanced use only: An alternate command to run instead of on. Use this to specify an alternate, device-specific, command that implements the on action.

For advanced use only: Specify an alternate timeout to use for on actions instead of stonith-timeout. Use this to specify an alternate, device-specific, timeout for on actions. For advanced use only: The maximum number of times to retry the on command within the timeout period. Use this option to alter the number of times Pacemaker retries on actions before giving up. In addition to the properties you can set for individual fence devices, there are also cluster properties you can set that determine fencing behavior, as described in Table 9.

Indicates that failed nodes and nodes with resources that cannot be stopped should be fenced. Protecting your data requires that you set this true. Red Hat only supports clusters with this value set to true. Allowed values: reboot , off. The value poweroff is also allowed, but is only used for legacy devices. How many times fencing can fail for a target before the cluster will no longer immediately re-attempt it. The maximum time to wait until a node can be assumed to have been killed by the hardware watchdog.

It is recommended that this value be set to twice the value of the hardware watchdog timeout. This option is needed only if watchdog-based SBD is used for fencing. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8. A cluster node may receive notification of its own fencing if fencing is misconfigured, or if fabric fencing is in use that does not cut cluster communication.

Allowed values are stop to attempt to immediately stop Pacemaker and stay stopped, or panic to attempt to immediately reboot the local node, falling back to stop on failure. Although the default value for this property is stop , the safest choice for this value is panic , which attempts to immediately reboot the local node.

If you prefer the stop behavior, as is most likely to be the case in conjunction with fabric fencing, it is recommended that you set this explicitly. For information on setting cluster properties, see Setting and removing cluster properties. Fencing is a fundamental part of the Red Hat Cluster infrastructure and it is therefore important to validate or test that fencing is working properly.

Use ssh, telnet, HTTP, or whatever remote protocol is used to connect to the device to manually log in and test the fence device or see what output is given. For example, if you will be configuring fencing for an IPMI-enabled device, then try to log in remotely with ipmitool.

Take note of the options used when logging in manually because those options might be needed when using the fencing agent. If you are unable to log in to the fence device, verify that the device is pingable, there is nothing such as a firewall configuration that is preventing access to the fence device, remote access is enabled on the fencing device, and the credentials are correct. Run the fence agent manually, using the fence agent script. This does not require that the cluster services are running, so you can perform this step before the device is configured in the cluster.

This can ensure that the fence device is responding properly before proceeding. The actual fence agent you will use and the command that calls that agent will depend on your server hardware. You should consult the man page for the fence agent you are using to determine which options to specify.

You will usually need to know the login and password for the fence device and other information related to the fence device. This allows you to test the device and get it working before attempting to reboot the node. When running this command, you specify the name and password of an iLO user that has power on and off permissions for the iLO device. Running this command on one node reboots the node managed by this iLO device.

If the fence agent failed to properly do a status, off, on, or reboot action, you should check the hardware, the configuration of the fence device, and the syntax of your commands.

3 Comments:

  1. Thanks for these tips Amanda I really wanted my new computer to have a great setup like you.

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